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Youtube Video: 5 Useful Public Speaking Tips

5 Useful Public Speaking Tips by the Toastmasters International

public speaking“Check out five time-tested Toastmasters tips that will help you master a topic and present it well. Following these tips will ensure your next speech goes smoothly and your audience gets more from the experience.”

Here are the public speaking tips extracted from the video:

  1. Know your subject and your speech.
  2. Know your audience and your space.
  3. Never apologize.
  4. Imagine yourself giving a great speech.
  5. Focus on your message, not on you.

If you want to overcome stage fright and learn to speak with confidence, join a toastmasters club.  You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

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Public Speaking Tips : Public Speaking For Shy Or Private People

Public Speaking For Shy Or Private People

How shy or private people can learn to speak in public?
Simply join a Toastmaster Club to Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking.
You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.
shy-private-people

Check out the below article Public Speaking For Shy Or Private People written by Niamh Crowe.

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Public Speaking For Shy Or Private People
 by Niamh Crowe

Learning public speaking is like learning to ride a bike. All you need is some initial courage and a sense of balance. Then you have to change gear as appropriate. Once you’ve progressed that far you simply learn when to put on the brakes. 

Most of us have suffered from listening to poor public speakers. We’ve squirmed as they’ve gone on endlessly saying the same thing in a dozen boring ways. Most of us too have admired brilliant speakers and wished we too could captivate an audience. At the very least most of us would like to express our views in public without losing our courage not to mention our voices. 

The thing most public speakers have in common is simply a fear of making fools of themselves. They may be college students who have to study rhetoric as part of their schooling. In adult life those who attend may be budding politicians, trade union activists or aspiring business people. There may also usually be a few shy singles and some married couples sharing a new experience in communications. However interesting the mix they don’t usually expect to start the class with breathing exercises.

Teachers will explain that these exercises will help pupils relax. The truth is that when you see others puffing and blowing you have to laugh. You simply can’t take yourself too seriously when you are bent double swinging your arms energetically. In the context of all this merriment it is usually a only a short matter of time before you all introduce yourselves and explain why you are taking public speaking classes.

Your first challenge is that you have to get used to speaking aloud. So many teachers provide poems and tongue twisters, even bits from the Bible for you to try. You may be asked to bring in your favourite book and read it to the class. You will discover that they quietest person in the class probably loves gruesome tales of the supernatural while the strongest looking footballer loves lyrical poetry. Once you have got used to the sound of your own voice you progress to speaking about everything under the face of the sun.

One week you may rivet your class with your speech about spies. The next week you will find yourself giving your views on the political system or the World Cup. A good teacher will help you to expand your mind and broaden your interests. You may find yourself in the public library swotting up on a totally new subject and actually enjoying it as you visualise yourself impressing your classmates. It doesn’t take long before you are hooked on the challenge of captivating your audience. It won’t matter to you whether they are classmates, members of the local chamber of commerce or even the world synod of bishops.

That’s fine when you can prepare your speech days in advance. Speaking off the cuff is a totally different but part of public speaking is teaching you to think on your feet. So try to imagine what you would say about forks, Santa or the sky at night without any time to prepare. A simple one-minute off the cuff talk can seem like endless torture. Eventually though you master the idea of making a riveting start, interesting context and a thought-provoking conclusion, even if you don’t know the first thing about the subject. You are on your way to being a competent public speaker. Obviously though you will speak with more passion and zeal when you are inspired by the topic. So if you love sport you will find that your sports speeches will have that extra something and that’s good.

All through your life this skill it will be an asset to you. You may have to speak on graduation day, at the office party, when your best friend celebrates his birthday or even at your daughter’s wedding. Your audience may be schoolmates, the local historical society, a computer convention or simply the parish youth committee.

You learn to use a microphone so that it doesn’t catch the knocking of your knees. You will have learnt how to emphasise a point, how to use notes, how to chair a meeting. You master nervous habits such as hand twisting or foot tapping. Most importantly, you learn to write to be said aloud rather than read. You will find yourself listening critically to other speakers whether they are on radio or television or in a local club. You will start saying to yourself, “he never mentioned X” or “He should have said something about Y”. You become, In fact, the original armchair critic. Above all though you will learn that public speaking is great fun.

Public speaking is a very personal thing. It gives you confidence and it makes you more articulate. It teaches you how to put your ideas in sequence. It also helps you to make new friends. Many public speakers join groups such as Toastmasters and make it a lifelong hobby. Others are simply satisfied to be able to give their viewpoint at a local meeting. If you are really lucky you might even find yourself being paid to lecture on a pet subject!

Being able to speak well in public helps your self-esteem. You may find you are welcomed to parties, invited to functions and it might even help you to impress your boss. Certainly it will expose you to lots of new ideas you hadn’t considered before. You might, like one speaker, learn to think of income tax as today’s equivalent to the tithes once paid to the church to support the poor. Now that’s what’s called a persuasive speech!
Public Speaking Tips For Shy Or Private People

How Shy or Private People can Learn to Speak in Public? Simply join a Toastmaster Club to Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking. You are welcome to Visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

public speaking, public speaking tips, shy people, private people, Toastmasters

Some people of course are naturals and can address any audience anywhere with enthusiasm and ease. Most of us though consider public speaking as a fate worse than death, until we learn to master it. The problem then is that by then it will be like the weekly crossword, you’ll just have to keep at it until you get it right.

There is absolutely no feeling like that of holding an audience in the palm of your hand. So go on grab their attention, entertain and inform them and send them away with your words ringing in their ears.

Whether you call it oratory, rhetoric or public speaking it will enhance your life and help you to make lots of new friends. Like learning to ride a bike it is a skill, once learned, that you never forget. 

You may wobble a bit if you get out of practise but soon all the skills you have learnt will soon come back. Then you’ll be freewheeling all the way and your audience will be delighted to come along for the ride!

About The Author

Niamh Crowe is the CEO of the web’s leading speech site (http://www.speech-writers.com) according to Alexa.com and Ranking.com. Online since 1994, her site has thousands of speeches for every event and occasion including birthdays, weddings, graduations etc. She lives in Ireland where she is married to Fred. They have 5 children.

Copyright
Niamh Crowe
Copyright Speechwriters 1994-2007
marketing@speech-writers.com
http://www.speech-writers.com
Tel. +353 1 8333599

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How to Give a Good Presentation / TED’s Secret to Great Public Speaking

TED’s Secret to Great Public Speaking

public speaking“There’s no single formula for a great talk, but there is a secret ingredient that all the best ones have in common. TED Curator Chris Anderson shares this secret — along with four ways to make it work for you. Do you have what it takes to share an idea worth spreading?”

Join Toastmasters and find a club that you like to practise your speeches in a friendly environment. You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

How to Give a Good Presentation

The students of Access Foundation at Kingston College pass on their wisdom about giving presentations in class.

A Good Presentation that will Amaze your Audience

How to give a good presentation? Giving a presentation is like being in total control of a situation. You have to know what you are talking about and how you talk about it – it is the responsibility of the presenter. Imagine giving people the wrong information or giving the right information but it was understood differently.

However, giving a good presentation is entirely different from having a broad knowledge about a topic. How so? Simply because it boils down to how you effectively presented your topic in such a way that you were able to convey your knowledge to other people successfully. To put it simply, it is the way your audience understood you and waawed by how you made them understand.

There are a lot of tips and tricks in successfully achieving a good presentation. There is really no precise format in doing so. It really depends solely on the person giving the presentation, on what works for him or her. Here are some of them:

Four Objectives of a Presentation

You should, at least, be able to apply any of these objectives in your presentation:

1. Information: Your goal is to inform, to share your knowledge on a given topic. Only discuss related and necessary information. Remember, too much of anything is considered boring.

2. Entertainment: As much as possible avoid jokes and just try to tell personal stories (short ones) thaare related to your topic (if possible). It is a sure way to your audience heart because you are giving them a glimpse of you aa person and not just the presenter. But do not dwell on it for too long, just enough to get your audience’s attention and then get straight to the point.

3. Emotional Touch: Tapping the emotional side of your audience is only applicable if the topic calls for it. But do not depress your audience, because sad people will not understand or remember anything. Avoid criticism if you cannot offer a solution.

4. Action speaks louder than words: A good presentation does not stop at just presenting your topic. Early on you should know what you want your audience to do after they heard your presentation. Be direct and specific, you should be able to get a commitment from them.

Preparing for a Presentation

In preparing for a presentation, you should think like a journalist. You should be able to answer the “what, who, why, how, when and where” (The Five Ws and One H) questions:

1. “What” is the purpose of the presentation? – Is it for training, seminar, for report, for planning, and etcetera? You have to know this so you can gather the needed information.

2. “Who” is your target audience? – This is also important because it will give you an idea on what content to use for your presentation that is appropriate to your audience.

3. “Why” are they attending the presentation? – This is relatively important too because you will know that if attendance is compulsory, you have to be able to make them realize that your presentation is not a waste of their precious time.

4. “How” many are attending the presentation? – Some presenters ignore this, which is wrong. It is important that you know the estimated attendees. Especially if you are using visuals, it is important that every attendee can see it.

5. “When” is the schedule of the presentation? – The date is crucial to your preparation because it will give you an estimate of how much time you have to finish your presentation.

6. “Where” is the venue of the presentation? – This is sometimes ignored too, and again it is wrong, simply because to know where the venue is will be important in determining what equipment that you will need to bring or to request. For instance, you might need a projector, microphones, a podium, and etcetera.

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Presentation Skills Training from World Champion of Public Speaking Craig Valentine

Presentation Skills Training from Craig Valentine

Watch the below videos and learn Presentation Tips from the 1999 World Champion of Public Speaking, Craig Valentine.  That’s really cool!

Practice is the key to helping you improve in public speaking.
Join Toastmasters and find a club that you like to practise your speaking skills. You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

Public Speaking Champ Holds Q & A in Hong Kong

Storytelling: A Key Secret to telling Great Stories

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How To Make a Speech Like a Pro

Public Speaking Tips: How To Make a Speech Like a Pro

effective public speakingIf you are expected to make a speech or give a talk, check out the below article for 8 simple tips that will help things go smoothly. 1. Practice in front of a video camera or mirror, and rehearse enough times to feel confident…

If you want to overcome stage fright and learn to speak with confidence, join a toastmasters club.

You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

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Public Speaking Tips – Make a Speech Like a Pro
By Judy Camp

Public speaking can be a scary thing the first few times you try it, but people who speak often have a few tricks that help improve their performance. If you are expected to make a speech or give a talk, here are eight simple tips that will help things go smoothly.

1. Practice in front of a video camera or mirror, and rehearse enough times to feel confident, without saying “um”. In between rehearsing, take a moment to close your eyes and visualize your audience smiling and enjoying your talk. Visualization might seem strange, but it has been proven that positive visualizing beforehand will create a positive experience.

2. Know the material well. The key to public speaking is not just to memorize enough for the presentation, but to really know it well enough to explain it without making a speech. That will make you much more comfortable and confident during your speech. Search out various sources of information, from different points of view, which might make your speech more colorful.

3. Think about your audience, and why they need the information, and where they are coming from. Figure out what they will find most interesting. Tailor your speech depending on the audience’s background, age, nationality and other demographics and psychographics.

4. Back up your points with solid facts. Don’t make accusations or speculate on points you cannot back up. If you do, and your audience does not agree with you, they will often stop listening entirely.

5. Create an outline and follow it. Your audience should not have a hard time following your thoughts or taking notes. Be clear when stating an idea about whether it is a main point or a subtopic.

6. Use visual aids, but keep them to a minimum. A simple slide show indicating the outline of your speech can help the audience follow along. But do not try to put everything into the visual aid, or it will be distracting.

7. Try to get comfortable with the setting. Take a look at the room in advance, if possible, and picture yourself giving your talk there. Relaxing is an important part of public speaking.

8. Perform deep breathing just before your speech, which will relax your body. If you can find a good place to do it, do some stretching exercises with your arms, head and shoulders.

By following these steps, you can remain confident during your speech.

Judy Camp is a writer for SolutionOriented.com, specializing in articles which offer business and career solutions for the small business owner or manager.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Judy_Camp

http://EzineArticles.com/?Public-Speaking-Tips—Make-a-Speech-Like-a-Pro&id=4792878

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Public Speaking Tips: Common Presentation Mistakes

Common Presentation Mistakes You Should Avoid

Public Speaking

Public speaking can be daunting.

Public speaking is the number one fear for a large majority of people. To share the message you desire to get out there you need to be good in your presentation.

Do you rely too heavily on notes when speaking?
Do you avoid eye contact?
Learn how to steer clear of some common speaking mistakes that might alienate an audience…

Here are some common presentation mistakes that you should avoid when speaking:

7 common mistakes to avoid when giving a presentation

Public Speaking Mistake #1 – Being Unprepared
Preparation is key for an effective presentation.

Public Speaking Mistake #2 – Not Knowing Your Audience
Tailor your presentation for relevance to your audience.

Public Speaking Mistake #3 – Not Having Clear Points
Give your audience a simple take away from your message by breaking it up into smaller points.

Public Speaking Mistake #4 – Over Dependence On Visuals
Don’t let your audience be victims of death by powerpoint!

Public Speaking Mistake #5 – Not Getting Honest Feedback
The simplest method to improve your presentation skills is to ask for feedback.

Bonus Tip #1: Not Having Your Timing Right
Comedians will tell you that the perfect joke relies more on timing than content.

Bonus Tip #2: Not Having A ‘Plan B’
What if…
… your opening line falls flat, the microphone fails, or you are constantly interrupted?
Create a contingency plan for a few worst case scenarios.
Don’t let your message be muted.

Youtube Video: Common Speaking Mistakes to Avoid

Here are some additional common speaking mistakes that you should avoid when doing your presentations:

1. Hiding from the audience.
2. Reading from your notes.
3. Offending your audience.
4. Not knowing your audience.
5. Obscuring your message.

For details, check out the below video about Speaking Mistakes to Avoid.

13 Additional Public Speaking Mistakes You Never Want to Make from Business Insider

1. Not tailoring your message to your audience
“Talk to a man about himself and he will listen for hours.”
“On the other hand, if you don’t talk to your audience about themselves, they most likely won’t listen.”

2. Eye dart
“From beginners to veterans, the majority of speakers fail to maintain meaningful, sustained eye contact with their listeners.
To visually connect, maintain eye contact for at least two to three seconds per person, or long enough to complete a full phrase or sentence.”

3. Distracting mannerisms
“There are at least 20 common tics to tackle, including: clenching or wringing your hands, pacing back and forth, keeping your hands in pockets, jingling change or keys, twisting your ring, gripping the lectern, licking your lips, adjusting your hair or clothing, fidgeting with a pen, bobbing your head, placing your arms behind your back, and touching your face.
As a remedy, record yourself speaking and watch the playback.”

4. Low energy
“A boring delivery — evidenced by a low monotone voice, dull facial expressions, and overall lethargy — is their most disliked trait.”
“To avoid losing your audience in a New York minute, crank up the energy level,” says Price. “Speak expressively, smile sincerely, move naturally, and enjoy the moment.”

5. Not rehearsing
Most proficient presenters prepare. “That is, they know the topic, organize their content, design a slide deck, and study their notes,” Price says.
“This bad habit results in the audience seeing and hearing the unrefined run-through, versus the finessed final performance.”

6. Data dumping
“Ditch the habit of data dumping. It loses the audience and undermines your innate ability to inspire, connect, and persuade.”

7. Not inspiring
“An engaging, memorable, and persuasive presentation is balanced with both information and inspiration.”
“It speaks to the head and the heart, leveraging both facts and feelings.”

8. Lack of pauses
“Many speakers have the bad habit of rushing through their content.”
“The three times you definitely want to pause include: before and after you say something very important which you want your audience to remember; before and after you transition from one key talking point to the next; and between your opening, main body, and closing.”

9. Not crafting a powerful opening
“The beginning is the most important part of the work.
So, open with a bang. Invest the thought, time and effort to craft and memorize the most important part of the work.”

10. Using too much (or not enough) humor
“You don’t want your presentation to be dry and boring, but you also don’t want to come off like you’re trying too hard to be a stand-up comedian.
A good rule of thumb is to be yourself, and infuse a bit of humor when appropriate.”

11. Reading from your slides
“The people watching your presentation can read, so giving them the exact same information verbally and visually can be boring and insulting.
Use slides as visual signposts for the points you’re making rather than a written version or summary of those points.”

12. Making an excuse or an apology
“Making an excuse or an apology sets a negative tone and gives people a reason to think your presentation was underwhelming.”

13. Ending with Q&A
“It’s fine to invite the audience’s comments and questions; however, be sure to end strong.”
“Craft an effective three-part closing where you deliver a strong summary; present a call-to-action; and conclude with a powerful closing statement.”

Need more public speaking mistakes to avoid?

Here are the Top 10 Presentation Mistakes mentioned in the below videos:

1. Little, if any, advanced planning and practice.

2. “Me” focused.

3. Lack of clarity and structure.

4. Too much information.

5. Lack of creativity or a Big idea.

6. Little client interaction.

7. Visuals: Too much, too many or none at all.

8. Reading slides or speech.

9. “Ums,” “so” and “you know”.

10. Weak opening/ closing or call to action.

Have you made any of the above mistakes in your presentations?

For details, check out the below videos for tips on top 10 public speaking presentation mistakes created by Marc Corsini…

We all make mistakes, even for professionals.

Here are the 10 public speaking mistakes successful people don’t make:

1. Feeling nervous about speaking in front of groups
“Arrive 15 to 20 minutes early to make sure the technology is working. Practice your opening so you will feel more comfortable. Turn your audience from strangers to friends by saying hi. Focus on serving the audience.”

2. Not telling great stories

3. Having a voice that shakes
“Warm up your voice before speaking. Breathe in through your nose, fill up your tummy.”

4. Avoiding humor

5. Picturing the audience “in their underwear”
Stop doing that. Picture talking to your friends in the living room instead.

6. Worrying about what to say during the Q&A
“Write down the possible questions people may ask you during the presentation. Practice answering these questions.”

7. Making a PowerPoint bullet-point data dump
“People want to listen to you, not your slides.
Storyboard your ideas with sticky notes. Find powerful images. Create engaging slides.”

8. Opening with “Good morning, everyone. Today I will talk about … “
“B-O-R-I-N-G. You only have seven seconds to grab your audience’s attention.
A great way is to ask a rhetorical question.”

9. Believing “practice makes perfect”
“Practice doesn’t make perfect; practice with feedback makes great improvement.”

10. Having a weak closing
“To inspire action, summarize your key points. Repeat your message. Give a specific action step.”

Avoid making the above mentioned presentation mistakes and get over your fear of public speaking.

If you want to overcome stage fright and learn to speak with confidence, join a toastmasters club.
You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

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