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5 Powerful Tips for Persuasive Presentations

No matter how big or small your audience is, the foundation for delivering a captivating presentation depends on your ability to build context. This is not about articulation, the use of language, vocal variety, filler words, verbal crutches, hand gestures, etc. This is more valuable than just technical speaking skills. It’s about how to connect with, and engage your audience.” public speaking

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Public Speaking – 5 Powerful Tips for Persuasive and Captivating Presentations

By Steve H Chang

Let’s face it. Most of us are not comfortable speaking in front of groups, especially when giving formal speeches or presentations. Standing on stage under bright lights, with all those blank faces staring at you, can be incredibly nerve racking. In fact, some people tremble at the mere thought of public speaking.

Did you know the fear of public humiliation is greater than the fear of death? It’s universally true across all cultures. It’s why most people are deathly afraid of public speaking.

Now here’s the paradox. To reach that “next level” of success, socially and professionally, the ability to speak in front of a group is a fundamental necessity. Overcoming this fear will release your untapped potential. It will unlock opportunities that you may currently find unattainable.

One of the most important life skills is communication. Being able to effectively communicate to groups of people gives you an incredible advantage.

Sooner or later you will be presenting. Maybe you need to pitch a proposal at a company meeting… give a sales presentation to prospective clients… or something as simple as voicing your opinion in front of some friends or colleagues. No matter how big or small your audience, the following 5 Tips will help you deliver persuasive, powerful presentations – guaranteed!

…But first thing’s first! I am not a professional speaker. I was no less afraid of public speaking than the next person. When I was young I avoided large groups. They intimidated me. So it wasn’t in my scope of reality to speak to a group of people!

Then as I got older I realized that shyness and greatness don’t mix.

Through training, I overcame that barrier. Not only did I learn to speak in front of a group, I learned how to present. My fear of speaking was replaced with the confidence to deliver impactful presentations to over a hundred people at a time. Now I’m even more comfortable on TV and on camera. So I can say first-hand that applying these skills has absolutely improved my life!

There are a lot of good resources for public speaking. You can find speaking groups, (like Toastmasters), in every major city. It’s a terrific way to develop some speaking skills. But, what I’m about to share with you is far more valuable than speaking skills alone. I’m not going to talk about articulation, creative use of language, vocal variety, filler words, verbal crutches, hand gestures, and other techniques.

Although public speaking techniques are invaluable for giving speeches, presentations are more interactive and often require facilitating audience engagement. When you’re able to deliver captivating presentations, every aspect of your public speaking skills will improve automatically.

The magic of a powerful presentation is in the ability to make an emotional connection and build trust.

This is achieved by creating the proper setting, or [context], which engages your audience as part of your presentation. Logic, facts and figures may build interest and even impress your audience. However, it won’t spark the emotional motivation that decisions are made from. And, it certainly isn’t enough to earn their trust. Win over your audience by speaking to their hearts, not their minds. Remember, presenting is “facilitating a conversation”. It’s not lecturing.

Creating context is how the best speakers in the world influence and inspire. The process can be so subtle that unless you know what to look for, you just think they’re amazing speakers – which of course they are! The point is, it can be duplicated. The process will even give you instant confidence. How’s that for a great by-product?

…Communication is an emotional contact sport. Presenting to groups is no different. The common mistake is to think that presenting is a one-way street.

5 Tips to Connect With Your Audience:

Yes, it’s your audience. And, no matter what you previously thought, “presenting” is two-way communication…even if you’re doing all the talking! Continue reading

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Common or Biggest Mistakes in Public Speaking

Do you make the following mistakes when you speak in public?   speaking tips

10 Common Public Speaking Mistakes

“Most of us attend more presentations than we give. Even if you’re not a public speaking professional, you can probably make a good assessment of whether someone you’re watching is doing a good job or not. However, you might not know exactly what it is they’re doing that turns you off – or perhaps you hone in on one particular thing that’s painfully obvious.

It takes a combination of qualities to make a good public speaker. Likewise, it takes several things – sometimes one big standout thing – to make a bad public speaker. Some of the most common public speaking mistakes are hard to spot, and many are difficult to overcome. See if you’ve noticed any of these – and whether you might be making them without realizing it.”

1. Speaking Too Softly

2. Stuttering or Saying “Um”
3. Stiff Body Movements
4. Poor Eye Contact
5. Lack of Facial Expressions
6. Poor Organization
7. Low Energy
8. Bad Timing
9. Reading (too much) from Notes
10. Using Space Inappropriately

Join Toastmasters

Practice is the key to helping you improve in public speaking.
Join Toastmasters and find a club that you like to practise your speaking skills. You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

13 Public Speaking Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make

“According to the National Institute of Mental Health, a whopping 74% of people suffer from speech anxiety.
And, as most people know, when we’re nervous or anxious, our minds and bodies tend to do weird things that we can’t always control.
However, if you make a conscious effort, you may be able to avoid some of the common mistakes public speakers make.

Here are some habits you’ll want to avoid…”

1. Not tailoring your message to your audience.
2. Eye dart.
3. Distracting mannerisms.
4. Low energy.
5. Not rehearsing.
6. Data dumping.
7. Not inspiring.
8. Lack of pauses.
9. Not crafting a powerful opening.
10. Using too much (or not enough) humor.
11. Reading from your slides.
12. Making an excuse or an apology.
13. Ending with Q&A.

The 5 Biggest Mistakes in Public Speaking

By Nancy Daniels

I recently had the opportunity to hear a world-renowned public speaker and was surprised as well as disappointed by his delivery. While his message was excellent, his means of delivering that message would have gotten him a C- in my college public speaking class. Without a doubt, content is important in any form of public speaking; however, if your entire script is written out word-for-word in your PowerPoint presentation, why bother? It would be a better use of the audience’s time if you would Xerox it, pass it out, and then everyone can go home!

1. Memorizing or reading your entire presentation is a grave mistake. Your audience came to hear you speak to them – not read or deliver a rote, memorized performance. Your responsibility is to communicate with your audience, not at them. By treating your audience as if you were having a conversation in your living room, you will find that you are much more comfortable and in better control of your nervousness.

2. Not knowing your material is another serious blunder. If you are not familiar with your words or how your speech or presentation flows, then you are likely to make more errors. Making a mistake or two is not the issue – making a lot of them is!

3. Speaking too fast. Controlling your speed is extremely important if you expect your audience to be able to understand what you are saying. Listening to someone move at 100 mph takes much more energy than listening to them at 75! Incidentally, talking at a furious pace saps the energy of you, the speaker, as well.

4. Staring at an object on the wall. By no means should you focus your attention on a spot on the wall or above the heads of your audience. Look them in the eye. Make the contact with your listeners and you will then be aware of their reaction to you. Remember, public speaking is a form of communication. If you are not making eye contact, then you are not communicating.

5. Running Out of Air. Breathlessness on the podium is one of the most common mistakes made because many novices – and even some professional – speakers do not think to breathe. If you wait until you are totally out of air, you will then be required to inhale a huge amount in order to fill your lungs. In doing so, you will experience breathlessness and a tightness in your chest. My advice is to learn to breathe with the support of your diaphragm – truly the best means of controlling nervousness – and then practice supplementing your air supply before you are depleted.

These 5 common mistakes can be easily rectified if you know your material, converse with your audience, learn how to control your speed, make eye contact with your listeners and remember to breathe.

The Voice Lady Nancy Daniels offers private, corporate and group workshops in voice and presentation skills as well as Voicing It!, the only video training program on voice improvement. To see how voice training can improve your life, both professionally and personally, visit Voice Dynamic or watch a brief video as The Voice Lady describes Dynamic Public Speaking.

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