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Public Speaking Tips: What is Your Message?

Public Speaking Tips: What is Your Message?

When you are preparing a presentation, one of the first things to do is to focus on your message.  Think of your message as the one thing you would like the audience to remember from your presentation.

For more information, check out the below article “Presentation Skills: What Is Your Message?”

If you want to overcome stage fright and learn to speak with confidence, join a toastmasters club.  You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

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Presentation Skills: What Is Your Message?
By Gilda Bonanno

When you are preparing a presentation, one of the first things to do is to focus on your message.

Think of your message as the one thing you’d like the audience to remember from your presentation. State it in one sentence, if you can – think of it as fitting on a headline of a newspaper or a billboard.

What’s the one thing stated, succinctly, in one sentence, that you’d like the audience to take away from your presentation? Whether you are talking for ten minutes or an hour, what would you like the audience to remember?

If we were to interview the audience after your presentation and ask, “What was the point of that presentation? What was the message?” would they all say the same thing? They may describe it using different words, but in essence, it should be the same content.

We’d want them to say, “Well, the point of that was to understand the three reasons for not moving ahead with this project now.” Or,”Well, the purpose of that presentation was so he could explain his management philosophy, and how he’s going to lead the team.” Or, “The purpose of that was to explain the first quarter numbers, and why they are not as good as we expected.”

So before you start putting together your material, your outline, and your slides, it’s important for you to be clear on your message. State it in one or two sentences and write it on the top of your notes or outline.

Because, if you’re not clear about exactly what you’re trying to communicate, it’s going to be very difficult for the audience to understand it.

To get more tips you can use immediately to improve your presentation skills, sign up for Gilda Bonanno’s free twice-monthly e-newsletter by visiting http://www.gildabonanno.com/Pages/newsletter.aspx and entering your email address.  Copyright 2013

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Public Speaking Tips for Better Presentations

Public Speaking Tips for Better Presentations

Do you want to be a better public speaker this year?
Follow the 10 step plan to build presentation self-confidence and reduce anxiety when speaking in public.

If you want to overcome stage fright and learn to speak with confidence, join a toastmasters club.

You are welcome to visit our Kampong Ubi Toastmasters Club if you are living in Singapore.

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New Year’s Resolution – 10 Steps to Prepare Better Presentations
By Andrew Ivey

New Year. New Year’s resolution. Like most things that are worthwhile it’s true that when we invest solid preparation in an important presentation we achieve a better result. I have never doubted it — but some times I have definitely been better prepared than on other occasions. So, in common with most people I have decided on a New Year’s resolution this January — be better prepared for my business presentations.

But this time, since my previous New Year’s resolutions rarely lasted much beyond February, I have noted down the key elements of better preparation. This simple check list should ensure that I am both better prepared for my presentations and less apprehensive about the output. It is equally true that sound preparation results in higher self-confidence and lower anxiety when speaking in public. Now that’s a bonus objective.

  • Write it down. Be prepared to write or type the whole of the presentation in full. Check over the length of the sentences and abbreviate where necessary.
  • Organize it. Aim to type the presentation in a standard lower case style using double line spacing. Use capitals at the start of a sentence or to emphasize certain words or phrases only. Begin each sentence on a new line. This will be important if you are to read the presentation from this script. Remember to select a typeface that you can read easily.
  • Mark it up. Word process the presentation with the appropriate mood advice, intonation markings and advice for extra emphasis. These pointers are for you — they should not feature in any scripts that you give to the organizer, the audience or the Press.
  • Read it. Read the presentation fully all the way through. Repeat this procedure several times becoming more and more familiar with the words and phrases. Where any particular words or sentences don’t work then mark these up for subsequent editing. This is the best time to ensure that all the words sound right and you are not to be caught out by tricky pronunciation. Continue reading
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